Inclusion

We believe it is in the nature of the arts to hold up a critical mirror to society, and to break down barriers between its different groups. But is our sector fully reflective of the communities we live in?  

This debate is about the urgency to open up the arts to all of society - to all the classes, ethnicities, physical abilities, and backgrounds that constitute it.

 

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What does it mean to be a woman in this alarming moment, let alone a woman who is leading a nonprofit arts organization? At its essence, “lead” originally meant “to see” or “illuminate the way.” In relationship to the metal it had to do with flow, which conjures collective movement, even progress, and a kind of abundance. This combination of meaning provides such a beautiful and elemental way of thinking about leadership. Contrary to what we are seeing today, leadership is not rooted in scarcity and is not about some of us winning and most of us losing. Rather, leadership is to see and...
The present Brainstorming report on “Social Inclusion: partnering with other sectors” is the result of the brainstorming process between 35 participating organizations, both from the cultural and other sectors.
Seit zwei Jahren kann man es wissen: Es herrscht eine krasse Schieflage im Theaterbetrieb, wenn es um die Repräsentanz von Frauen und Männern geht: In Leitungspositonen und im Regie-Fach gibt es sehr viel weniger Frauen als Männer, unter den aufgeführten Schauspielautor*innen sind sie in der Minderzahl, ebenso wie zumeist in den Ensembles. Dazu verdienen sie oft wesentlich schlechter als ihre männlichen Kollegen.
The Culture Change Guide is a toolkit that's been guided by best practice recruitment principals and explores how you can think about developing a diverse workforce and leadership.
Support for arts and disability has increased over the past few years. But do programmers have unconscious prejudices? Nina Mühlemann speaks to Unlimited 2018 artists and producers – and shares some advice.
image from Acting together #with refugees - © Teatro dell'Argine
Acting Together #WithRefugees is a project led by Teatro dell'Argine (Italy) aiming to foster the social inclusion of refugees and asylum seekers through artistic tools and through the settling of a close cooperation with local institutions, organizations, associations and individuals working in the social, educational and cultural fields.
MUNICH — In the summer of 2015, the world watched in astonishment as Germans cheered crowds of refugees streaming into train stations throughout the country. Scenes from that unprecedented — and short-lived — moment of welcome form part of “What They Want to Hear,” one of two current productions about exile and its ordeals at the Münchner Kammerspiele, one of Munich’s, and Germany’s, most important theaters.
Endless, Community Dance Project. Dançando com a Diferença © Júlio Silva Castro
Acesso Cultura (Portugal) considers that, thanks to the continuous promotion of accessibility and the legislation in force, professionals in the cultural sector are more aware now of the existence of physical barriers to cultural venues. However, in addition to the legislation not being implemented, it is also true that our reflection on access does not go much further than the physical aspect and, even in this case, beyond the need for ramps and adapted bathrooms.
Women are the major consumers as well as the largest percentage of employees in the arts. Yet their presence as artistic leaders remains low or, in some sectors, non-existent. Of the 28 organisations presently funded under the Australia Council framework of the major performing arts, only three, Black Swan Theatre Company, Orchestra Victoria and the Queensland Symphony Orchestra, have female artistic leaders
Samantha Robinson and James Atherton in Andrea Dunbar’s Rita, Sue and Bob Too at the Royal Court, London, in 2018. Photograph: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian
Publicly funded art is still dominated by a privileged elite who fail to engage the majority of the population

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