EU Policy

No matter whether the EU is (supposed to be) driven by an economic rationale or by common intangible values, the cultural element of its essence is not something to neglect. In the context of the gloomy reality of today, the EU needs to invent a bold new narrative, and to nourish and strengthen the sense of a common culture. The arts are there to create a space and tools for various communities to engage in dialogue, where different views can be freely shared, understood and accepted; conditions needed to sustain democracy and to enable the EU to exist as well as prosper. 

This section is both about the role of culture and the arts in the future of the EU, and about the EU policies which affect our sector.

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The decision of UK citizens – to stay or leave the EU – will affect the cultural life of future generations all across the continent. So how do European citizens hope they will vote? Katherine Heid shares her perspective.
Europe has a ‘problem’; it is becoming a ‘less cultural continent’ as fewer Europeans are ‘engaging in cultural activities’. This paper questions the existence of this ‘problem’ and instead suggests that there is a shared problematisation across Europe sustained by common discursive archaeology that employs various discursive strands in relation to a dominant institutional discourse. The argument is that the ‘problem’ of ‘non-participation’ legitimates a ‘solution’ that predates its emergence: the state subsidy of arts organisations.
The book No Culture, No Europe: On the Foundations of Politics, edited by Pascal Gielen brings together contributions by an interdisciplinary group of theorists and scientists who argue that the European Union’s lack of attention towards culture is the main cause of the today’s political and economic crises.

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