EU Policy

No matter whether the EU is (supposed to be) driven by an economic rationale or by common intangible values, the cultural element of its essence is not something to neglect. In the context of the gloomy reality of today, the EU needs to invent a bold new narrative, and to nourish and strengthen the sense of a common culture. The arts are there to create a space and tools for various communities to engage in dialogue, where different views can be freely shared, understood and accepted; conditions needed to sustain democracy and to enable the EU to exist as well as prosper. 

This section is both about the role of culture and the arts in the future of the EU, and about the EU policies which affect our sector.

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This Report illustrates the achievements of Creative Europe in 2018, in line with its mission to safeguard cultural diversity and strengthen the competitiveness of the cultural and creative sectors, in particular the audiovisual sector. In presenting the wide range of activities undertaken and the results achieved, the report shows the value of Creative Europe as a whole, which is greater than the sum of its individual parts.
©barnyz
The new European Parliament has taken its shape, and David-Maria Sassoli was elected as the Parliament President. Mr Sassoli is a member of the Group of the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats and of Partito Democratico (Italy).
©ArtReach
The EU’s Creative Europe programme made grants worth nearly €3.1 million to 11 UK-led applications this year, even though these projects would be thrown into disarray in the event of a no-deal Brexit.
In this paper co-signed by Circostrada, EDN, ETC and In-situ, we call on the European Institutions and the Member States to acknowledge the inherent power of the performing arts.
Photo:  Visualhunt.com
A new document draws together relevant Government policies on topics including touring to EU countries, moving goods across borders, and adapting to a new intellectual property landscape.
erman European Parliament member Axel Voss during the vote on the new Copyright resolution (CC-BY-4.0: © European Union 2019 – Source: EP via flickr)
Depending on who you ask, the controversial rule change will either censor vast swaths of artists or provide new avenues for remuneration and legal support.
Departing from the current political, economic, humanitarian, and environmental crises of Europe, this session at IETM Munich gathered ideas to revive democracy and the European project, while rejecting ultra-nationalist parties that demand separation from the European Union and seek to return to a mythical notion of the nation-state, as well as the political-economical functionary elite that has used the EU for its austerity politics.
The present Brainstorming report on “Social Inclusion: partnering with other sectors” is the result of the brainstorming process between 35 participating organizations, both from the cultural and other sectors.
Our newest Toolkit builds on the discussions on advocacy held at IETM meetings since 2008 and on concrete actions carried out by IETM members in different countries. The publication summarises the key elements of advocacy, presents some inspiring practical cases from different countries, and offers links to practical resources - all freely available online - to develop a thorough advocacy action
Mobility is a social and economic condition of artists and culture professionals and, at the same time, a vector of social and economic development. However, mobility in the cultural and creative sectors is faced with a number of issues that need to be addressed at EU and national levels. The paper provides recommendations for a EU-wide mobility framework which entails both a dedicated mobility scheme and an improved regulatory environment that would facilitate mobility in Europe.

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