Développement des publics

Les artistes donnent un sens aux œuvres d’art, mais le public leur donne la vie – ou vice versa ?

Peu importe pour qui nous créons (ou nous pensons créer) ¬ pour nous-mêmes ou pour eux ¬ sans un public, nous ne pouvons ni prouver la valeur intrinsèque de nos pratiques, ni gagner notre croûte.

Comment pouvons-nous nous assurer que notre société qui change si rapidement n’arrêtera pas de contribuer aux arts ? Comment établir un lien mutuellement enrichissant entre les artistes et leur public ? S’agit-il de relations authentiques ou de stratégies marketing ¬ ou les deux ?

Elena DI FEDERICO
Plenty Productions shares its experience of developing new audiences for its show Snakes and Ladders through outreach and targeted marketing activity. An interesting read to learn how to engage Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) audiences, involving communities in touring productions, and developing audiences for touring productions.
Elenq
"This article presents findings from an in-depth project carried out with five audience-participants at cultural events during Leeds’ annual LoveArts festival. The researchers asked participants to explain what the arts meant to them. They discovered that people found cultural value difficult to articulate. They concluded that instead of striving to rationalise the value of the arts, we should try to feel and experience it."
Élargir la participation à la vie culturelle
gotomka
Audience engagement is a contextual and often contingent process. It is defined by wider politicl disocurses and agendas and Élargir la participation à la vie culturelle makes this very clear. Publication sets audience engagement practices in relation to various cultural policies from the post-was democratisation to recent culture-led development policies. Apart from being a good overview of these relations from the French perspective, it shines even more in the way it presents case studies - critical, detailed analysis of each of the 20 projects makes it clear how challenging, limiting and...
gotomka
Making sense of audience engagement walks a very fine line between usability and depth and manages to be both critical and practical. It is a valuable insight into a range of US based audience engagement practices. Unlike many audience development publications, this one is based on a clear definition of what it means to be engaged in an artistic experience and offers valuable and usable models for thinking and working on creating memorable artistic experiences.
Public policies and practices for access
gotomka
Developed through Open method of Coordination (OMC) among EU member states, this report sets as its goal to make an overview of policies and good practices for widening the access to culture implemented by public cultural institutions and policy-makers all over EU. Although it is not performance arts specific, it is a good place to go for an overview and idea-seeking. It is however not flawless due to its somewhat restricted view on culture and participation to institutionalised cultural life.
gotomka
Over the course of the XX century, spactatorship has fell from grace of critical thinkers. As it became interlocked with passivity, spectatorship has come to be viewed as a remnant of old, hierarchical, mindless days of thetrical practices. In his famous lecture turned article turned book, Ranciere emancipates spectator, claiming that such a dominant view on spectatorship is itself discriminatory - there is much more going on in the head of a seemingly passive spectator that we usually come to think. And this is no news for anyone, we all are thoughtful yet often in the position of spectators...
Kawashima - Beyond attenders
gotomka
Nobuko Kawashima's research paper is one of the first (and best) critical studies into audience development in policy and practice. In 2000, before audience development has swept the plains of all European cultural policies, Kawashima questioned assumptions, expectations and realities of policy on audience development. Namely, she claimed that there is an assumption that participation in cultural activities is good for everyone and desired by all, and that cultural participation is only a matter of certain removable barriers. However, as she formulates it: "such an idealistic view of culture...
Alessandro Borelli
Data suggest that some types of cultural organizations are perceived as more welcoming than others. Here’s how we could do better.
Elenq
"Many organisations will have a subjective view of most of their audiences. To highlight this, I’m going to consider what I might look like to some of the organisations I’ve visited in the past year. I may only be one person, but you’ll see I look very different to the organisations I chose to visit."
Elenq
In a world where individualism has killed cooperation and the capacity for being and working together, where cooperation sucks and self-reliance seems so cool, we are smoothly and consistently dismantling all social ties. Why am I supposed to do something with my neighbours? I'd rather do it alone. Cultural initiatives that challenge this extremely individualized model of the world are worth closer attention, as they help us re-establish social ties and our trust in others.

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