Sustainability

How to make a living as an artist? How to survive as an arts organisation?

As we continue struggle out of the crisis, we must give ourselves a chance; not for survival, but for success.  

To start with, let's reassess our professional strategies and business models. How do we use our potential and our resources? How do we contribute to the sustainability of the environment we work and live in? What does sustainability in the arts mean and how to achieve it? And what role can the arts play in that wider issue: helping to save the planet, the environment we live and work in?

Share

In 2017, Joris Janssens (Flanders Arts Institute) was invited at the Producers Network Meeting & Forum in West Kowloon Cultural District (Hong Kong) to share the experiences from Flanders and Europe with international networking since the 1980s - in order to inspire the development of this new Asian network with European experiences.
Iulia Popovici describes the challenges faced by the independent performing arts sector in a country where public theatres monopolise the majority of fundings.
This political moment is the opportunity of a lifetime to change our business practices, to call for organization, discourse, and reform within our own community. We can “drain the swamp.”
When addressing the status of artists in Romania, the general conversation tends to be about the low income and inadequate social services for those working in the arts. The creative ecosystem is viewed as unpaired, and therefore worthy of a distinct status within society.
When we talk about equity, it is often about tangible resources: Income, funding, food, housing, access to green space, etc. Rarely do we recognize that time is just as critical a resource, and that it is also inequitably distributed.
IETM gets ready to host its Plenary Meeting in Bucharest, Romania, with a particular focus on the current position of the artist in contemporary societies, as well as on the financial and social conditions of pursuing a career in the arts. This series of articles reveals what is to be an artist in today's Romania.
The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts.
Unpaid or ‘free’ labour is an important element of how precarity has been theorized. It is also an issue that is often seen as endemic to cultural and creative work, rightly attracting a range of criticism.
The plaza in front of the one of the festival theatres. Nitra, Slovakia.
While I grew up during the fall of the Soviet Union, it’s important to acknowledge that Western anti-communist propaganda and the lingering effects of the Cold War kept me distanced from any realistic notion of life and culture in Eastern Europe.
There are bleak realities behind the façade of some performing and visual artist’s successful international careers: the manic, frenzied life, the insecurity and fear of hyper-mobility and residency- or studio-hopping. What are some of the strategies to have more sustainability in artists’ working conditions? Band-aid solutions might be short-sighted. It is time for a radical re-imagining of the system.

Pages

Already a member?

Log in to post your own content or join the discussion.

Or to sign up.