Sustainability

How to make a living as an artist? How to survive as an arts organisation?

As we continue struggle out of the crisis, we must give ourselves a chance; not for survival, but for success.  

To start with, let's reassess our professional strategies and business models. How do we use our potential and our resources? How do we contribute to the sustainability of the environment we work and live in? What does sustainability in the arts mean and how to achieve it? And what role can the arts play in that wider issue: helping to save the planet, the environment we live and work in?

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In a conversation on “How Tech Companies Think About the Arts” at the 2017 Americans for the Arts Annual Convention in San Francisco, artists and arts organization had an opportunity to connect with philanthropic representatives from Silicon Valley companies to learn and exchange ideas on how to better engage one another.
There’s a stock image of the urban cultural ideal: bustling streets filled with colorfully painted walls, galleries with their doors wide open, live music bubbling out from local venues. This is the kind of environment, with economic as well as artistic benefits, that city governments around the world are looking to foster.
Independent producers work just as hard as independent artists; however, I feel there is a growing disconnect between independent artists and independent producers. Sometimes I believe people think that independent producers make more money than independent artists. I wonder if that's because of the word ‘producer’?
How can cities continue to grow and attract investment while preserving their cultural infrastructure – and the vibrancy and diversity that make them unique? Our new ‘Making Space for Culture’ handbook for City Leaders explores how world cities across the globe are answering this question, from San Francisco to Shenzhen
photo of the seminar Ahead of the Curve in Berlin, May 2017
Twelve years in but ahead of the curve – is the 2005 UNESCO Convention still the right tool for the promotion and protection of the diversity of cultural expressions? Has it ever been? What do the marginalised voices need to do in order to influence global debates and policy making and how do we tackle the many crises of our times?
Through the analysis of the CDCE’s transfer from international level to Mercosur and ASEAN regions, my article seeks to explore four key questions : why do actors engage in norm transfer ? Who are the key actors involved in the norm transfer process ? What is transferred and why ? What restricts or facilitates the norm transfer process ?
Sandra Coumans talks about how cultural organisations from Eastern Europe and the Balkans learn from each other on an international level.
Mobile applications have been a hot topic for a long while within the visitor-serving industry. There are mobile applications for all kinds of museums, zoos, aquariums, historic sites, and performing arts entities. But are people using them? And do they increase meaningful performance metrics like visitor satisfaction?
Culture, consuming culture, also leaves a carbon footprint. Laura Panda is well aware of this. For a decade she has been working on calculating that footprint and finding ways to reduce it.
© Jens Bjerregaard
This research seeks to develop greater understanding of the impacts of globalization, digitalization, and (im)migration on the work of arts managers and arts management researchers. Different from studies that focus specifically on those who work exclusively in international contexts, this paper aims to present current research based on an international empirical study of arts managers who do not necessarily cross borders for their work and who would in most cases not even consider their work international as such.

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