Sustainability

How to make a living as an artist? How to survive as an arts organisation?

As we continue struggle out of the crisis, we must give ourselves a chance; not for survival, but for success.  

To start with, let's reassess our professional strategies and business models. How do we use our potential and our resources? How do we contribute to the sustainability of the environment we work and live in? What does sustainability in the arts mean and how to achieve it? And what role can the arts play in that wider issue: helping to save the planet, the environment we live and work in?

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A guide to building a balanced, sustainable artistic life. Don't starve. Make art.
Nearly 60% of theatre and dance organisations claim to have benefited financially from being more environmentally friendly, according to a new survey.
Ah, “sustainable.” It is a buzzword of the moment, showing up in discussions ranging from the environment, manufacturing, agriculture… even the arts. Of course, everyone wants to be sustainable, thinking that they, their product, or their service will stand the test of time and last forever. I’d like this willful misuse of the term to stop—particularly among arts organizations.
Sustainability in the dance field is composed of four interconnected dimensions: cultural(including artistic), ecological, economic and social. It is therefore only natural that in orderto strengthen the sustainability of the dance field it is necessary to pay attention to all fourkey aspects. The keðja Think Tank on Sustainability calls for a holistic approach in dancesector development, taking into account the entire value chain and the life cycle of artisticwork and careers. The recommendations are divided into five key areas with the followingaims: (1) to build bridges between the dance...
Preemptive Media (Beatriz da Costa, Jamie Schulte, Brooke Singer), AIR (Area's Immediate Reading), 2006. Prototypes of portable air quality measurement kits to monitor various air pollutants, accompanied by data visualizations of the findings. AIR is a process-oriented, socially based artwork that integrates the community into the creation and presentation of the work.
Sustainability has become the new “social networking”-at least it seems to have superseded the latter as the catchword du jour. An increasing number of conferences, think tanks, art exhibitions and publications have been devoted to the subject over the past few years and have reached critical mass. One might argue that a focus on sustainability is the next logical step after the rise of social networking enabled by the user-generated content of Web 2.0 sites-such as blogs, Wikis, MySpace, YouTube, and Flickr: networking itself is intrinsic to digital technologies, which allow for multiple...
This guide will help you to integrate environmental sustainability in capital projects from conception through to completion. It focuses mainly on larger capital projects and redevelopment of existing buildings and infrastructure, but is also relevant to smaller capital projects and new builds.
In the summer of 2010 I performed in my first ever Fringe Festival. I had known about the Fringe circuit for a long time. I had volunteered at the San Francisco Fringe as a technician ten years earlier where I saw some of the worst theatre in my life. It was at that point (at the ripe age of twenty-five) when I decided to stop pursuing theatre the way I had previously. By this point I had created three solo shows and directed a play I wrote, but when I moved to the Bay Area something changed.
In the theatre world, the desire to reach new audiences is important not only as a monetary venture, but also as a way to experiment with new ways of doing and defining theatre. Cultivating new audiences is usually part of the mission statement of any theatre, troupe, or individual artist.
“We need the ability to create ideas that in advance are thought to match the many narrative tools we shall use digitally and socially.” Steffen Hjaltelin, Danish advertising guru and director, Hjaltelin Stahl
In his keynote speech opening the IETM Satellite Meeting in Gwangju, dance critic Namsoo Kim mentioned the travels of a 13th century Flemish monk, Friar William of Rubruck, to the Mongolian courts of the Great Khans. In his account of this journey, William talked about the conversations in a big tent, set up for representatives of different religions to meet face to face. There, they had day-long discussions about their beliefs and differences, but always with mutual respect and at the end of the talks everyone raised the glass. A remarkable story that certainly inspired a group of 120...

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