Sustainability

How to make a living as an artist? How to survive as an arts organisation?

As we continue struggle out of the crisis, we must give ourselves a chance; not for survival, but for success.  

To start with, let's reassess our professional strategies and business models. How do we use our potential and our resources? How do we contribute to the sustainability of the environment we work and live in? What does sustainability in the arts mean and how to achieve it? And what role can the arts play in that wider issue: helping to save the planet, the environment we live and work in?

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In response to the current COVID-19 crisis, ISACS circulated a survey among their members to ascertain the impact of same on their livelihoods.
This first episode of the Rewiring the network for the twenties series brings an in-depth introduction to the journey ahead of us and explains the methodology we will follow.
This report summarises the key findings of the survey we have circulated among our members to get a grip on how the COVID-19 crisis has affected them so far.
Cultural sector in Romania has been severely affected by the coronavirus pandemic. Early March, cultural organisations started to postpone their events (exhibitions, music concerts, film festivals, workshops, masterclasses, theatre plays).
The arts sector needs to play its part in dealing with the significant changes that have occurred in our climate. For artists it is to imagine new futures that accommodate all of society; for institutions it is to divest themselves of board, sponsorship and partnership arrangements with fossil-fuel producers. The two are interlinked.
Move on! is a practical guide aimed at European artists and cultural professionals starting their international careers. It provides practical tips and lists online resources that can be useful for European artists and cultural professionals from all arts and cultural disciplines, including teachers in art schools and universities.
With the Arts disappearing as a Federal Government department title, David Pledger looks around the world to see how other nations value their culture and finds some lessons for Australia.
The Security, Creativity, Tolerance and their Co-existence : The New European Agenda on Freedom of Artistic Expression outlines how European governments carry the legal responsibility to respect, protect and fulfil obligations to artistic freedom. The report further draws attention to the alarming trend of governments targeting artists under the existing laws such as anti-terrorism legislation, or with the use of laws prohibiting offending religion such as hurting “religious feelings” and art that is considered to be “blasphemous” or “obscene”.
A new UNESCO study uncovers persisting and emerging challenges artists and cultural professionals face and examines how countries around the world are addressing these issues through policymaking.
Performing arts practices of today survive in a peculiar ecology thanks to the role given to various cultural institutions, whose mission is no longer to produce art but to reproduce a consumerist relation to work in art, whereby the artists grow less and less present through their artworks and more and more through their labour.

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