Inclusion

We believe it is in the nature of the arts to hold up a critical mirror to society, and to break down barriers between its different groups. But is our sector fully reflective of the communities we live in?  

This debate is about the urgency to open up the arts to all of society - to all the classes, ethnicities, physical abilities, and backgrounds that constitute it.

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The creation and production of knowledge has been a monopole of industrialized economies. Their economic conditions are the guaranty to provide the better conditions to reach a privileged status. Generally, knowledge creation processes tend to have a predominant ethnocentric focus, in which so-called rich country or developed economy perspectives have prevailed. However, there are disciplinary subjects where the production of knowledge can be influenced not only by economic conditions but by cultural aspects as well. Arts management knowledge is a good example to support this proposition...
picture from "Forbidden Fruit" performance by ilDance (picture by Israel Aloni, ©ilDance)
Despite the many discussions, conferences, symposia, organizations, demonstrations and social engagements surrounding the topic, many are not precisely concerned with gender issues. What is the sector really interested in? Why do the discussions about gender only involve men and women? Are these social debates? Have we been so caught up in the fictional reality that our bright human intellect created, that we can no longer identify when we slipped off track?
Platform: East European Performing Arts Companion
Platform: East European Performing Arts Companion – was written by thirty seven authors from twelve countries and is the effect of years of cooperation between theatre theorists, critics and historians from Central and Eastern European Countries.
As the IETM Satellite Meeting in Beruit is underway, Raphael Khouri's story about being unable to tell people about a queer Arab play she directed is incredibly timely and important.– Geoliane Arab.
Four outstanding museum directors discuss what has to be done to reach equality
Chay Yew, artistic director of Victory Gardens Theater, says: “We can’t be twenty-first-century Americans if we don’t know African American, Latino, Asian, Native, and white histories and narratives. They make up our complicated collective history as citizens, as a nation, and we need to own them.”
What happens when marginalised cultures take centre stage? In this Arts Podcast, we explore Hiraeth, a new dance production inspired by Armenia’s painful history, and speak to Kabosh, a Belfast-based company that has been investigating how theatre can help to resolve conflict in Africa.
"Particularly as a white person, writing “raceless” characters in works of realism can be just as harmful as writing stereotypical characters of color…there is no such thing as a “raceless” person."
The arts sector talks a lot about diversity, but what can actually be done to achieve it? Monica Montgomery suggests ten ways to take action.
The concept of Equality is compelling because it is easier to understand, less messy, and less risky than Equity. Equality requires less effort to grasp. True Equity takes time, energy, and thoughtfulness. It requires us to reexamine everything we know and change systems and practices that we have been using for hundreds of years. This is often painful and uncomfortable. So we openly flirt with Equity while still staying firmly in the arms of Equality.

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