Inclusion

We believe it is in the nature of the arts to hold up a critical mirror to society, and to break down barriers between its different groups. But is our sector fully reflective of the communities we live in?  

This debate is about the urgency to open up the arts to all of society - to all the classes, ethnicities, physical abilities, and backgrounds that constitute it.

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Last year, we helped to circulate a major survey produced by On The Move and commissioned by the British Council through Europe Beyond Access. Out now, their striking preliminary “Time to act” report highlights the barriers that disabled people experience when accessing the arts.
Following the “Make culture central in the EU recovery” open letter we published and endorsed on 30 October 2020 together with 109 other pan-European cultural networks, our group comes together again in a second letter to reiterate our call to the national governments and the European Commission to secure a future for culture and cultural life in Europe.
Our SHIFT Newsletter on Gender & Power Relations tackles the #METOO movement, gender inequality and gender-based violence in the workplace – and the urgency for structural changes in the cultural and creative sectors.
In this Declaration from the European Theatre Forum 2020 co-written by IETM, we address the current challenges faced by theatre and the performing arts and put forward eight policy recommendations and actions to strengthen these sectors in the years ahead.
This short report summarises the key findings of our On the Road Munich, organised in collaboration with Meta Theater on 24 October 2020, both online and on-site in the Pasinger Fabrik in Munich, Germany.
Working towards raising awareness of the barriers that disabled artists and audiences continue to face when accessing Europe’s cultural institutions, this report heralds a clear call to policymakers and funders to seriously reduce the cultural exclusion of disabled people.
This publication sheds some light on the different IETM events and publications which brought attention to the IDEA topic, and gives voice to six IETM members who each in their unique way describe their stance on inclusion.
The main focus of the IETM Rijeka working session Please turn off your cell phone was the issue of attracting new audiences into what are considered as traditional performing arts venues and formats. How do we reach out to potential new audiences that do not identify as regular theatregoers? This report summarises the discussions held on who gets to participate and who remains excluded, and how this occurs when traditional audience behaviours are required.
Dr David Stevenson talks about audience diversification, confronts the dominant hierarchy of cultural activities, and looks to create space for valuing everyone's chosen cultural experiences the same way.
Our Satellite meeting in Milan focused on language as a political and social concept and a backbone of accessibility in the arts, with a particular emphasis on the position of sign languages across the globe. This report provides an introduction to sign language culture, brings insights into the role of translation in revealing the reality of our exchanges and proposes key elements that define a language.

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