Audience Development

Artists give meaning to the work of art, but the audience gives it life - or vice versa?

No matter for whom (we think) we create - for ourselves or for them, without an audience we can't prove the extrinsic value of our practices, nor can we earn our bread and butter.

How can we make sure our rapidly changing society doesn't abandon the habit of participating in the arts?  What are the ways to develop a mutually enriching and continuous connection between artists and audiences? Is it about authentic relationships or marketing strategies - or both?

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This IETM Rijeka report explores the intersection between art and activism, focusing on increasing the political effectiveness of artistic action.
The main focus of the IETM Rijeka working session Please turn off your cell phone was the issue of attracting new audiences into what are considered as traditional performing arts venues and formats. How do we reach out to potential new audiences that do not identify as regular theatregoers? This report summarises the discussions held on who gets to participate and who remains excluded, and how this occurs when traditional audience behaviours are required.
The far ones, invisibles, uncountables, the multitude - the ones who do not take part. It is not audiences, but their absent relatives, the ones who could not be understood, involved or included who are presenting the biggest disruption in the orderly polis of our culture.
Cultural development is inherently linked with the qualification of so-called artistic excellence and artistic autonomy. At the same time, cultural participation is an inseparable part of cultural democracy. Thus, enhanced cultural participation without compromising the arts represents one of the most important challenges for democratic cultural policy.
Performing arts practices of today survive in a peculiar ecology thanks to the role given to various cultural institutions, whose mission is no longer to produce art but to reproduce a consumerist relation to work in art, whereby the artists grow less and less present through their artworks and more and more through their labour.
This study concerns the attendance motivations for cultural services based on the audience’s level of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to define the role played by general knowledge (e.g. cultural education) and specific knowledge (e.g. communication around a cultural product) in the attendance motivation trajectory of a cultural service.
Goran Tomka explores the definition of audience development from different angles, explains the correlation between spectatorship and citizenship, and studies the phenomenon of an implied or implicit audience.
Dr David Stevenson talks about audience diversification, confronts the dominant hierarchy of cultural activities, and looks to create space for valuing everyone's chosen cultural experiences the same way.
Nevenka Koprivsek puts forward her opinion on what defines the relation between the artist and the spectator while challenging some of the most common concepts around audiences and providing insight into the reality of working in the Balkan region.
The cultural democracy notion stemmed from the belief that many cultural traditions coexist and none should dominate over the others as the “official” or “high” culture. Another premise of cultural democracy is that everyone should be free to participate in cultural life.

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