Sustainability

How to make a living as an artist? How to survive as an arts organisation?

As we continue struggle out of the crisis, we must give ourselves a chance; not for survival, but for success.  

To start with, let's reassess our professional strategies and business models. How do we use our potential and our resources? How do we contribute to the sustainability of the environment we work and live in? What does sustainability in the arts mean and how to achieve it? And what role can the arts play in that wider issue: helping to save the planet, the environment we live and work in?

Elena POLIVTSEVA
The public debate on artist fee guidelines "Who pays the artist?" was the logical next step after BKNL (Beeldende Kunst Nederland) had published results of the second survey on artist fees, published in November 2015. Those results shows that the call for a new directive is widely supported. Artists, art support organisations, arts centres and even the national government, all agree upon the fact that the current situation is unsustainable.
Fernando BITTEN...
El sector de las artes escénicas, afectado gravemente por la crisis económica (que ha comportado la reducción de recursos públicos y el descenso notable del consumo), debe, en el corto plazo, salvar la oferta y, en el medio plazo, reforzar la demanda.
Theatre in the Age of Climate Change—A HowlRound Journal Series
Vijay MATHEW
How does our work reflect on, and respond to, the challenges brought on by a warming climate? How can we participate in the global conversation about what the future should look like, and do so in a way that is both inspiring and artistically rewarding? This is an on-going HowlRound.com Journal Series curated/peer-produced by Chantal Bilodeau .
Fernando BITTEN...
This report looks at the innovative instruments which can facilitate access to finance for the cultural and creative sectors. Such instruments need to be part of well-functioning and efficient financial ecosystems.
Elena POLIVTSEVA
Cultural producers adopt different strategies to cope with the effects of the great recession and differentiate the sources of their funds. Looking at a sample of cultural operators in Catania (Italy), the multi-product choice and the network-based co-opetitive solutions are examined to offer some policy suggestions.
Fernando BITTEN...
Public cultural institutions must be makers – and not hostages – of digitalisation. This requires resources – museums, theatres or libraries need to be able to actively invest in digital transformation – especially in times of dwindling public funding. At the same time, the Cultural and Creative Industries are experiencing an ongoing boom of investments in digital infrastructures including platforms and streaming services, which are attracting a dynamically growing demand. But high usage alone does not generate an income for artists and creative professionals in the digital age – on the...
Fernando BITTEN...
Because our systems aren’t just broken for artists, they are broken for everyone. I’ve come to believe we can’t really improve life for artists in any broad or lasting way without improving life for everyone.
Fernando BITTEN...
What’s next in the fight against declining audiences and exclusivity in the arts? Clever pricing strategies are all well and good, but what we really need is market segmentation, argue Howard Buckley and Rosie Hanley.
Elena POLIVTSEVA
"What does the deregulated, privatized economy possibly have to offer artists? For anyone who believes artistic representation preserves, or should preserve, an impulse for freedom and a degree of social dissent, the very possibility of a détente between artists and neoliberalism must be greeted with alarm.
Olivia SAUTEREAU
From the workshop Production Houses vs Compagnies – IETM Budapest – Friday 6 nov. 2015

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