Développement des publics

Les artistes donnent un sens aux œuvres d’art, mais le public leur donne la vie – ou vice versa ?

Peu importe pour qui nous créons (ou nous pensons créer) ¬ pour nous-mêmes ou pour eux ¬ sans un public, nous ne pouvons ni prouver la valeur intrinsèque de nos pratiques, ni gagner notre croûte.

Comment pouvons-nous nous assurer que notre société qui change si rapidement n’arrêtera pas de contribuer aux arts ? Comment établir un lien mutuellement enrichissant entre les artistes et leur public ? S’agit-il de relations authentiques ou de stratégies marketing ¬ ou les deux ?

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For a theatre company, its primary product – art on stage – remains platform specific, despite the always-encroaching live streams in movie houses. Ideally, audiences will continue to appreciate the unique nature of watching theatre live on stage. However, the content surrounding a play or musical should be far from a fixed experience. And audiences are craving context.
A great amount of time, energy, and resources are put towards bringing in new, non-traditional audiences. But what are we doing with those newbies once they arrive? How are we treating them to ensure they come back?
This four-part series documents the experiences of a young, Fulbright fellow, avidly exploring theater and life in Bucharest, Romania.
Taking as its starting point the Nordic cultural policy debates surrounding audience development, which concentrate either on reaching out to new target groups or on artistic quality, this article suggests that the focus on the audience’s experience of theatre performances has thus far been underdeveloped.
How Steppenwolf Theatre Company is turning singlie-ticket buyers into repeat visitors. by Bob Harlow, Thomas Alfieri,Aaron Dalton, and Anne Field
After collecting more than 100,000 survey responses, Leo Sharrock and Helen Palmer can reveal the main reason people attend the arts.
This post is part of a series explores what it's like for an artist to have an entrepreneurial mindset, and all of the different challenges that can come with it.
Despite decades of investment in audience development and the current enthusiasm for all things data, arts organisations still aren’t getting it, says Michael Nabarro.
Since the 2011–2012 season, Mixed Blood Theatre in Minneapolis has practiced Radical Hospitality, providing no-cost access to all mainstage productions for any audience member.
Dr. Jane Chu
The Wallace Foundation announced a $40 million arts initiative, which will provide funding for approximately 25 arts organizations over six years to build and maintain audiences.

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