Inclusion

We believe it is in the nature of the arts to hold up a critical mirror to society, and to break down barriers between its different groups. But is our sector fully reflective of the communities we live in?  

This debate is about the urgency to open up the arts to all of society - to all the classes, ethnicities, physical abilities, and backgrounds that constitute it.

 

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Cette étude a été réalisée dans le cadre du project européen MAdeleine H/F, porté par Réseau en Scène. Elle présente un état des lieux des questions d'égalité, élargit aux secteurs des arts plastiques et visuels, du livre et de la lecture publique, ainsi qu’à de nouveaux axes de recherche, et à un spectre plus large de structures, dont les associations de taille modeste. Létude est accompagnée par la Charte Madeleine H/F , un outil au service de l'égalité de genre dans les organisations culturelles, ainsi que par la BD Madeleine H/F .
Ana Dinger explores theatre as a “place of listening” through the work of Mónica Calle and Rui Catalão.
This toolkit, developed by the Arts Council of Wales, aims to help theatre companies and venues become more accessible for deaf audiences.
Much has been made about artists gentrifying working-class neighborhoods and neighborhoods of color seemingly just by moving in. Some activists have called this “a new form of colonization.” Writing for CityLab, Peter Moskowitz recently wrote about how this happens and what artists can do about it
Maria Vlachou, directrice exécutive de Acesso Cultura | Access Culture, une association à but non lucratif qui vise à promouvoir l'accès à la participation culturelle au Portugal, écrit à propos du travail réalisé dans le pays afin d'abattre les obstacles structurels et géographiques qui s'opposent aux arts et à la culture.
Maria Vlachou, Executive Director of Acesso Cultura | Access Culture, a not-for-profit that promotes access to cultural participation in Portugal, writes about work being done in the country to break down structural and geographical barriers to arts and culture.
Elizabeth Horn reflects on how in the aftermath of #MeToo, it is more important than ever to teach the next generation of theatremakers ideas of consent, respect, and how to advocate for themselves as artists.
Chantal Bilodeau kicks off this week’s series on Theatre in the Age of Climate Change by suggesting that women in the arts may be our planet’s best bet for survival.
This case study will examine Unlimited’s work supporting the British Council to take small parties of disabled artists and producers to IETM, both to give these creatives increased networking opportunities and to open up discussion about diversity within the network.
Sexism goes deeper than sexual intimidation. Take the dance world. From recurring Lolita-fantasies on stage to auditioning naked and backstage power abuse; female dancers talk about the repercussions of a professional reality that celebrates unclear borders. ‘The only difference from sex workers is that we hide behind the name of art.’

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