26 April 2018 to 29 April 2018
26 April 2018 to 29 April 2018
 

Funding access: why, what and how?

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Cultural venues face multiple challenges to provide physically and intellectually disabled audiences with the means to participate in their activities. Socio-economic conditions and the territorial span of what artistic professionals have to offer reinstate the need for long-standing strategies to ensure that the issues of accessibility are effectively tackled, and there is engagement with the need for diversity and outreach. Cultural agents - those who make and those who present art – must address this same question: who are they working for and whom do they want to have as audiences and participants of their work? This should be the foundation for decisions on funding policies for accessibility.
Starting with an overview of the accessibility resources and needs which exist in Portugal, we will frame this state of affairs  with reference to the examples instated at the European level. We will also highlight different technical aspects of accessibility and touch upon the political debate about access. This session is for peers who have experience with the topic, but it will also provide tips and tools for everyone to make venues and performances more accessible.

This venue is fully accessible for wheelchair users.

Speakers
Reitoria da Universidade do Porto - Sala do Fundo Antigo
Praça de Gomes Teixeira
4099-002
Porto
Portugal
27 April, 2018 - 14:00 to 15:15

Share your ideas

Comments

image of Ben EVANS

I'm really looking forward to taking part in the panel discussion. I'm really interested in the way the discussion is framed - about an artist's commitment to engage with a broad audience which does not exclude. In my view Access is a political and artistic commitment, not just a last minute add-on in order to keep the funders or the politicians happy.

I've been asked to help bring a more international context. I'll try to share interesting examples from across Europe of access provisions which are led by the artists. I'll also share some thoughts on different places you might go for the funding of these activities.

Of course, as I am very used to saying, although funding is helpful, the most important thing is for artists and producers to start their own journeys to a better understanding of their audiences. Taking those first steps - bringing a disabled artist into your rehearsal room, developing a advisory panel of engaged disabled audience members, or organising the most simple of training for your teams - is a huge opportunity: artistically, politically, and an opportunity to break out of the bubble artists can find themselves in.

Join us!

PS If you're interested I've started to add some links below to interesting films and information.

Posted 1 year 6 months ago
image of Ben EVANS

OK. I am learning how this works now!

This video: Examples of integrating access for Deaf & visually impaired audience INTO theatre productions.

Posted 1 year 6 months ago
image of Ben EVANS

An article about an initiative which hosts disabled artists and producers in mainstream venues for a period of time - helping support an organisation to become more knowledgeable.

Posted 1 year 6 months ago
image of Ben EVANS

The Humane Body - a Creative Europe supported partnership between four leading dance venues to develop work which supports the engagement of visually impaired audiences and dance professionals. Wiener Tanzwochen (Vienna, Austria), Kaaitheater (Brussels, Belgium), Centre National de la Danse (Paris, France) and The Place (London, UK)

Posted 1 year 6 months ago
image of Ben EVANS

An overview of disability and the arts in Portugal
(I'm on a roll, now!)

Posted 1 year 6 months ago
image of Diana BASTOS NIEPCE

I found this book very interesting.

Posted 1 year 6 months ago
image of Henriqueta OLIVEIRA

In Lousã, we have been working hard so that each one of us can access culture and arts, no matter age, sex, color,religion, mental or physical condition.... That's why we began "building ramps" a long time ago. ARCIL, a non-profit social orgnization for disabled people, founded in 1976, in Lousã, taught us to believe in the full potential of those who are somehow different. Nowadays, we no longer need to be reminded... it happens naturally and we are commited to it. Still a lot to learn and a long way to go, of course, that’s why It will be great to meet today and share ideas, examples and suggestions.

Posted 1 year 5 months ago
image of Henriqueta OLIVEIRA

New link for the video

Posted 1 year 5 months ago