Digital Shift

"We can't keep the 21st century outside the theater much longer." (Scott Walters).

The digital revolution is a fait accompli. Like a soluble medicine, it has dispersed into today's reality and changed it beyond recognition. It affects our creative practices and production, as well as our communication and our audiences' habits.   

How can we approach the generation of the digital age? Does technology stifle creativity or, on the contrary, open doors for imagination? 

We hope this debate will empower the performing arts community - with ideas, skills and courage - to take advantage of the potential gains and pay attention to the possible risks the digital age gives rise to.

HowlRound—Twitter Plays: When Theatre Connects with Reality
vijaymathew
"Though it may not seem obvious at first, social media and theatre have a lot in common. Both are communal experiences based on a give-and-take relationship, in which one person is performer while the other is spectator."—Theatremaker Jeremy Gable.
HowlRound: "Theatre in a Mobile World: Critiquing Convention and Calling for Innovation"
vijaymathew
"As theatre artists, we must tap into the potential of mobile platforms to extend the qualities of our art that differentiate it from other art forms as increasingly, more and more individuals see digital space as the home of their truest selves."—Kyle A. Thomas
HowlRound Blog Series: "Media Design in Performance" by Daniel Fine
vijaymathew
This HowlRound series of 8 blog posts by designer Daniel Fine offers a multi-disciplinary approach to achieve the best practices for collaboration in the creative and production process of incorporating digital media into live performance.
vijaymathew
The Ford Foundation hosted Beyond the Hashtag, a conversation on using art and technology to combat the criminalization of our communities . The event livestreamed on the global, commons-based peer-produced HowlRound TV network on 15 September 2015 included performances and discussions with leading artist-activists whose powerful work calls for the safety, well-being and self-determination of LGBTQI and multiracial communities.
vijaymathew
Playwright Lia Romeo discusses the innovative approaches two theatre companies have taken to incorporate technology into the audience experience of her play Connected.
fbittencourt
Public cultural institutions must be makers – and not hostages – of digitalisation. This requires resources – museums, theatres or libraries need to be able to actively invest in digital transformation – especially in times of dwindling public funding. At the same time, the Cultural and Creative Industries are experiencing an ongoing boom of investments in digital infrastructures including platforms and streaming services, which are attracting a dynamically growing demand. But high usage alone does not generate an income for artists and creative professionals in the digital age – on the...
Elena DI FEDERICO
If we want technology to bring us a better future, we must contest the imperative of speed and democratise engineering. We must bring more imagination to the field of technological innovation. Most of all, we must ask bigger questions about what kind of society we want. Technology will follow, as it usually does. (photo: Martin Parr/Magnum)
Victor Mayot
Each day, as the ongoing chaos in our world is on full display in the media cycle, I'm reminded of how essential arts organizations are to our communities. They provide a home and a platform for conversations and artistic expression that our society thirsts for. But I'm worried about them. Currently, they're fighting a range of headwinds that threaten their very existence -- and it's not just isolated cases. From challenges with fundraising and decreased arts coverage in press outlets to the struggles of growing an audience base to, much more recently, security concerns, there are many things...
safadi
Live and recorded screenings have the potential to develop and serve new audiences for small-scale theatre companies, as well as generate income, report concludes.
IETM
A great amount of time, energy, and resources are put towards bringing in new, non-traditional audiences. But what are we doing with those newbies once they arrive? How are we treating them to ensure they come back?

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