Digital Shift

"We can't keep the 21st century outside the theater much longer." (Scott Walters).

The digital revolution is a fait accompli. Like a soluble medicine, it has dispersed into today's reality and changed it beyond recognition. It affects our creative practices and production, as well as our communication and our audiences' habits.   

How can we approach the generation of the digital age? Does technology stifle creativity or, on the contrary, open doors for imagination? 

We hope this debate will empower the performing arts community - with ideas, skills and courage - to take advantage of the potential gains and pay attention to the possible risks the digital age gives rise to.

fbittencourt
Public cultural institutions must be makers – and not hostages – of digitalisation. This requires resources – museums, theatres or libraries need to be able to actively invest in digital transformation – especially in times of dwindling public funding. At the same time, the Cultural and Creative Industries are experiencing an ongoing boom of investments in digital infrastructures including platforms and streaming services, which are attracting a dynamically growing demand. But high usage alone does not generate an income for artists and creative professionals in the digital age – on the...
Elena DI FEDERICO
If we want technology to bring us a better future, we must contest the imperative of speed and democratise engineering. We must bring more imagination to the field of technological innovation. Most of all, we must ask bigger questions about what kind of society we want. Technology will follow, as it usually does. (photo: Martin Parr/Magnum)
Victor Mayot
Each day, as the ongoing chaos in our world is on full display in the media cycle, I'm reminded of how essential arts organizations are to our communities. They provide a home and a platform for conversations and artistic expression that our society thirsts for. But I'm worried about them. Currently, they're fighting a range of headwinds that threaten their very existence -- and it's not just isolated cases. From challenges with fundraising and decreased arts coverage in press outlets to the struggles of growing an audience base to, much more recently, security concerns, there are many things...
safadi
Live and recorded screenings have the potential to develop and serve new audiences for small-scale theatre companies, as well as generate income, report concludes.
IETM
A great amount of time, energy, and resources are put towards bringing in new, non-traditional audiences. But what are we doing with those newbies once they arrive? How are we treating them to ensure they come back?
IETM
Why should the digital bring about ideas of progress in the theatre arts? This question opens up a rich seam of provocative and original thinking about the uses of new media in theatre, about new forms of cultural practice and artistic innovation, and about the widening purposes of the theatre's cultural project in a changing digital world. Through detailed case-studies on the work of key international theatre companies such as the Elevator Repair Service and The Mission Business, Bill Blake explores how the digital is providing new scope for how we think about the theatre, as well as how the...
IETM
In the theatre world, the desire to reach new audiences is important not only as a monetary venture, but also as a way to experiment with new ways of doing and defining theatre. Cultivating new audiences is usually part of the mission statement of any theatre, troupe, or individual artist.
IETM
“We need the ability to create ideas that in advance are thought to match the many narrative tools we shall use digitally and socially.” Steffen Hjaltelin, Danish advertising guru and director, Hjaltelin Stahl

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