EU Policy

No matter whether the EU is (supposed to be) driven by an economic rationale or by common intangible values, the cultural element of its essence is not something to neglect. In the context of the gloomy reality of today, the EU needs to invent a bold new narrative, and to nourish and strengthen the sense of a common culture. The arts are there to create a space and tools for various communities to engage in dialogue, where different views can be freely shared, understood and accepted; conditions needed to sustain democracy and to enable the EU to exist as well as prosper. 

This section is both about the role of culture and the arts in the future of the EU, and about the EU policies which affect our sector.

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A new document draws together relevant Government policies on topics including touring to EU countries, moving goods across borders, and adapting to a new intellectual property landscape.
Depending on who you ask, the controversial rule change will either censor vast swaths of artists or provide new avenues for remuneration and legal support.
Departing from the current political, economic, humanitarian, and environmental crises of Europe, this session at IETM Munich gathered ideas to revive democracy and the European project, while rejecting ultra-nationalist parties that demand separation from the European Union and seek to return to a mythical notion of the nation-state, as well as the political-economical functionary elite that has used the EU for its austerity politics.
The present Brainstorming report on “Social Inclusion: partnering with other sectors” is the result of the brainstorming process between 35 participating organizations, both from the cultural and other sectors.
Our newest Toolkit builds on the discussions on advocacy held at IETM meetings since 2008 and on concrete actions carried out by IETM members in different countries. The publication summarises the key elements of advocacy, presents some inspiring practical cases from different countries, and offers links to practical resources - all freely available online - to develop a thorough advocacy action
Mobility is a social and economic condition of artists and culture professionals and, at the same time, a vector of social and economic development. However, mobility in the cultural and creative sectors is faced with a number of issues that need to be addressed at EU and national levels. The paper provides recommendations for a EU-wide mobility framework which entails both a dedicated mobility scheme and an improved regulatory environment that would facilitate mobility in Europe.
The European Alliance for Culture and the Arts calls for an open and multi-stakeholder debate on how to design a citizen-centred, truly effective and forward-looking Cohesion Policy, aimed at ensuring a prosperous and sustainable future for the European Union and each European citizen. Cultural and creative sectors must be recognised as substantial contributors to the shaping and implementation of such a policy.
The points are presented on behalf of the performing arts sector. Elaborated by IETM and co-signed by Circostrada, EDN, ETC and In-situ.
Creative Europe is a unique programme in Europe, tailored to the needs of the cultural and creative sectors. It is the main programme that contributes to the cultural policy objectives of the EU. The programme targets the right priorities, but its modest budget prevents it from making a substantial impact. The report provides recommendations for a more ambitious future programme, reflecting the richness of European cultural diversity.
For the next long-term EU budget 2021-2027, the European Commission is proposing to increase funding for Creative Europe, the programme supporting European cultural and creative sectors and audiovisual works, to €1.85 billion.

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