Value of Arts

Today's world is obsessed with measuring the impact of every field of public (subsidised) activity. Does your project entail spending public money? Then be prepared to justify its value with numbers and facts.

While numerous studies reveal the power of culture in driving economic growth and creating jobs, it is difficult to quantify the intangible impacts of arts.

 

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Towards cultural democracy: promoting cultural capabilities for everyone is the final report of King’s fourth Cultural Enquiry. On the basis of a 15-month research project, it presents a timely and distinctive vision of how to build a cultural life for the UK that is valuable for everyone, and made by all.
There is no doubt that making a commitment to assist artists at risk is tough. It is challenging enough to read about the plight of persecuted populations in the papers or watch news of oppression on television. The narratives and images yank at our hearts, cause our stomachs and throats to knot up. Sometimes the images haunt us for days. Eventually, though, we change the channel, toss the paper out, and get on with our lives.
We are living in a moment when many contemporary artists have turned to social engagement as an artistic form. Like philosophers, they bring into an investigative light the behaviours, words, and deeds that society is taking for granted.
27 healthcare providers in the North West of England have committed to developing a cultural prescription plan for new and expectant mothers to give children the “best start” in life.
New data released Tuesday suggest that in a single year, the US arts and culture sector contributed a whopping $763.6 billion to the nation’s economy — more than the entire GDP of Switzerland.
This publication collects relevant evidence substantiating the impact of culture across a range of EU policy fields. The evidence included in this impact review demonstrates without doubt the EU added value of culture and the subsequent need to properly support the cultural ecosystem.
© Jana Gellinck
Public condemnation, prohibition from working, repressions, prosecution, trial and imprisonment, forced exile, ban for travel, economic censorship are mechanisms through which authoritarian regimes silence free speech and artistic expression. This session presented the cases of censorship from Turkey, Poland, and Iran, which revealed the graveness of the situation today.
© Jana Gellinck
This IETM Brussels session was an attempt to cast aside all the doubts, disbelief and frustrations regarding the EU’s cultural policy, and to take a courageous look into the further, deeper future. Panelists and participants allowed themselves to dream and envisage what should be the right place, role and resources for culture and the arts within the European project.
Having followed the Commission’s high-level conference on the future MFF-framework on 8-9 January 2018 as well as discussions in the European Parliament, the European Alliance for Culture and the Arts calls on the European institutions and Members States to ensure substantial support for culture, the arts and heritage within the post-2020 Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF).
© Jana Gellinck
This IETM Brussels session has explored the tensions between the artist as both a romantic outsider and an activist insider. Each panelist had an experience in engaging with civic movements: some from recent years, others – for decades, some on a local level, others on an international one.

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